Dismal Nitch rest area to receive modern facelift

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Tuesday, December 24, 2013

The National Park Service and other local partners plans to renovate a "dismal" area near the north end of the Astoria Bridge beginning in 2015.

Estimated to cost about $1.3 million, the project aims to make the aging cinderblock building and grounds beside the Columbia into a more suitable gateway for prime Lewis and Clark historical sites along the river’s north shore. Collectively, these sites are being called the Columbia Pacific Passage, and extend from the Pacific-Wahkiakum county line to Cape Disappointment.

An access grant from the Federal Highway Administration will provide 86.5 percent of project funding, with the remaining 13.5 percent coming from NPS, Washington Historical Society and the Washington State Department of Transportation – $175,000 in either cash or in-kind services.

 

Read more at The Daily Astorian.

 

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