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Oregon makes money by selling voter information

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Must Reads
Monday, December 23, 2013

In the past five years Oregon has generated $86,226 by selling voter information to political parties, campaigns, and private corporations.

The state charges $500 for the database, which includes full names, addresses, phone numbers, date of birth, party registration and voter history. It does not include how anyone voted.

The people who buy the database are not supposed to use it for commercial purposes, said Tony Green, a spokesman for Secretary of State Kate Brown. In fact, they must sign a form agreeing not to do so.

Records show Oregon has sold the database to companies all over theU.S. who are using it to make a profit despite having signed the affidavit.

Read more at Statesman Journal.

 

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