Business leaders outline poverty-fighting strategies

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Monday, December 09, 2013

Oregon business leaders say the states should overhaul its tax policies for low-income earners.

Officials aim to reduce the poverty rate below 10 percent by 2020. Currently, 17.2 percent of Oregonians -- including about a quarter of children -- live in poverty, up more than four percent from before the recession, the report said.

Part of the problem in Oregon is a tax structure that, like in other states, fails to make work pay, the report said. As low-income Oregonians earn more, they lose access to food stamps, cash welfare assistance and other benefits at the same time that their tax liabilities grow. The practical effect is a disincentive for some Oregonians to return to work and stop relying on public assistance.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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