Fewer enrollments challenging Cover Oregon's budget

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Monday, December 09, 2013

Cover Oregon has lessened enrollment projections which could mean higher costs for consumers.

Once the federal money dries up, Cover Oregon will get most of its funding from a fee added to each enrollee's monthly premium. With fewer people now expected to enroll and pay the fee, Cover Oregon would need to collect more from each individual to break even. The agency's board is scheduled to set the fee in March.

Cover Oregon's budget experts are now predicting a smaller pool of applicants with a higher average age. They lowered their most pessimistic enrollment projections for 2014 by 18 percent to 105,500.

Read more at The Democrat-Herald.

 

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Guest
+1 #1 No More Wasted Tax Dollars for Cover Oregon!Guest 2013-12-09 19:28:05
I've watched as billboards with ZERO information about healthcare appeared on every other major arterial. Instead of helping people get healthcare we saw cartoon characters and nonsense phrases like "long live Oregonians." In the midst of the Silicon Forest with all of these high tech experts around, we can't get our website up and running. No one can enroll.

Why were those MILLIONS AND MILLIONS of taxpayer dollars not allocated to provide healthcare? There are many low income, charity and volunteer clinics and providers who could have provided HEALTHCARE to sick people.

Where are their priorities? Oregon continues to make the news as having ZERO enrollees despite getting a jump on the project by adopting the exchanges and taking millions of federal tax dollars.

Where are the priorities? Where are the smart people who can make decisions to benefit Oregonians, not line the pockets of some big corporation and a bunch of bureaucrats?

Disgusting!
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