Portland joins national fast food protest

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Friday, December 06, 2013

A downtown Portland rally was a small part of a nationwide campaign for higher wages.

Labor organizers planned protests across Oregon and southwest Washington Thursday, including locations in Gresham, Salem, Ashland, Medford and Vancouver. The Service Employees International Union is leading the push nationwide, though Thursday's turnout across the country was difficult to gauge.

It was business as usual inside the downtown Portland McDonald's during the rally, as about three dozen customers were eating. Workers did not strike and walk out of the restaurant.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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