Cover Oregon director on medical leave

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Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Cover Oregon executive director Rocky King stepped down to take medical leave.

King's departure, announced at a Cover Oregon board meeting, came as the project he led for two years remains largely unable to enroll people despite costing more than $140 million so far. He said the site is in final testing mode and should be operational later this month. "It's closer than you think," King said.

King will be replaced temporarily by Oregon Health Authority director Bruce Goldberg until a longer term replacement is found.

King has battled illness through the year, missing several days and weeks at a time. He said it's time for him to follow the advice of his doctors and family and take a three-month medical leave, despite his desire to see the project through.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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Guest
0 #1 A Rocky Start and FinishGuest 2013-12-03 22:33:08
Based on the article, I've seen no documentation that this individual was experienced and capable of taking on this project. I think one would have to be an expert in systems, IT security, and insurance. It sounds as if he were simply a mid level bureaucrat with experience in personnel matters. As with Obamacare the "smart people" are not using much common sense.

After 60 days it says 219 PAPER applications have been completed but as yet no one is signed up? Millions and millions of dollars that could have provided MEDICAL CARE, PREVENTATIVE CARE, and other health services are wasted on a non functioning website and the most moronic ads in history. I am extremely tired of seeing tax dollars thrown down the drain while the buddy system, favor trading and career politicians reap the benefits.
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There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

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New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

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