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Oregon restricts pesticides

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Friday, November 22, 2013

Oregon is permanently banning some pesticides after a massive bee die-off.

In June, about 50,000 bumblebees were found dead and dying in a Target parking lot under linden trees that had been sprayed with dinotefuran, part of a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids.

An investigation into the incident won’t be completed until mid-December, Katy Coba, director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, told a legislative committee this afternoon.

But ODA already has taken steps to protect bees from neonicotinoids, Coba said.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

 

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