Oregon project works to add minority teachers

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Monday, November 11, 2013

TeachOregon is helping Oregon school districts hire minority teachers to reflect changing student demographics.

About a third of Springfield's students are minorities, but its teaching staff is more than 90 percent white.

District officials say the program will eventually pay for itself using a "pay forward, pay back" model, where a portion of the new teachers' salaries will be withheld for five years. The district will then pool the leftover teacher salary money together each year to pay for the program.

Read more at KOMO.

 

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Guest
0 #1 Skin Color Doesn't Mean A Better TeacherGuest 2013-11-11 19:43:37
Numerous studies have shown that the quality of the TEACHER is more important than dollars or class size when it comes to student learning. A great teacher makes a real difference.

Why then is there a focus on SKIN COLOR? Great teachers come in all hues, sizes, blue eyed, green eyed, brown eyed, curly hair, straight hair. What matters ESPECIALLY to minority students who have a historically higher drop out and lower achievement scores, is the quality of the teacher, his or her dedication.

Skin color should not be a primary focus in hiring, promoting or paying teachers.
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Guest
0 #2 General Political ActivistGuest 2013-11-11 23:07:04
We need to replace our current system of school-to-priso n, and replace with a sincere effort of school-to-work- small business-home ownership-leade rship, while expanding opportunities for not merely K-12, but that of K to College. While many successful leaders did not graduate from school, they remain the freakish exception to the rule. Most of us, have to cultivate an effort, in order to become productive or proficient in our career or industry. Just saying.
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