Bend to overhaul water system

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Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Bend is close to breaking ground on an overhaul of the city surface water system.

The city’s initial plans were shelved last fall. That was after a federal judge ordered construction to stop, amid allegations that planners relied on faulty environmental assessments.

Those assessments were used in the city’s permit application with the U.S. Forest Service. After the ruling, the city submitted a new proposal that reduced the maximum amount the city would be able to draw from Tumalo Creek and established a system to monitor stream flow.

On Monday, the Forest Service approved the plan.

Read more at OPB.

 

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