Nonprofit helps Ashland homeowners upgrade

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Monday, November 04, 2013

The nonprofit Clean Energy Works helps homeowners improve their energy-guzzling homes.

More Ashland residents will now be able to take advantage of Clean Energy Works programs because the nonprofit partnered in September with the city of Ashland, which has a long history of offering conservation and energy efficiency programs.

Clean Energy Works, which partners with local banks and approved local contractors, can help residents get loans of $30,000 or more, said Ben Scott, an Ashland resident and the Southern Oregon regional coordinator for Clean Energy Works.

Read more at The Mail Tribune.

 

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