Cover Oregon hand sorts 7,300 paper applications

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Friday, November 01, 2013

Cover Oregon has turned to old-fashioned paper applications due to glitches in the new online insurance marketplace.

The paper application is 20 pages long and asks for everything from the names and the number of people in your household, to pension contributions and alimony payments.

Cover Oregon spokeswoman, Amy Fauver, says applicants who want to take the paper route, need to fill out the form and send it back.

“And then we do an eligibility determination in-house, on their behalf,” she said.

That means Cover Oregon staff comb through documents to find out whether someone is eligible for a tax break, or for the Oregon Health Plan.

Read more at OPB.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 Commercials Were Predictive of QualityGuest 2013-11-01 18:20:59
Anyone who watched the inane commercials or the ridiculously cartoonish billboards had to wonder about the quality of this process, not to mention fears about the fate of their health with such a group of airheads in charge.

The early billboards made NO reference to Cover Oregon's function. As someone in the medical field I knew what it was about but those who might NEED coverage would glean little from the childish drawings of trees and some big round thing...not sure what that represented. Further there was no website or phone number listed. What was the point? Oh and the commercials.... perfect example of why those bumper stickers that say "Keep Portland Weird" are not a joke. They mean it.

I understand NO ONE has actually signed up through the exchanges and the vast majority of inquiries are for MEDICAID...free health care! That's going to help cover all the uninsured right?

Obamacare was ill conceived, a "solution" in search of a problem. Sadly Mrs Peloi's statement has come true. Now we know what's in it!
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