Oregon must act quickly on CRC, ODOT head says

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Thursday, October 24, 2013

Oregon lawmakers must act this fall to recommit money to the Columbia River Crossing, Oregon Department of Transportation Director Matthew Garrett says.

“I want to be clear. That conversation needs to happen right now,” Garrett said. “I do believe we are at a hinge moment on this project.”

Even with slim odds, Garrett reiterated recent claims that delaying the proposed Interstate 5 Bridge replacement would ultimately add to its cost and risk losing the favor of top federal partners.

Read more at The Columbian.

 

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