Intel scientists study effects of air pollution on computers

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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Intel scientists in Hillsboro are studying the effects of air pollution on the insides of computers, to protect electronics in India and China.

Intel engineers spotted the problem a few years ago, when the company noticed an unusual number of customers from China and India returning computers with failed motherboards, the component that houses the microprocessor brains.

The culprit is sulfurous air pollution produced by coal that’s burned to generate electricity. It corrodes the copper circuitry that provides neural networks for PCs and servers.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

 

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