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Companies sue to lift logging ban

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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Three timber companies filed a lawsuit to lift a logging ban in national forests from the federal government's shutdown.

“It makes zero sense for the cash-strapped government to shut down operations that pay millions into the United States Treasury,” said Tom Partin, president of the American Forest Resource Council, in a press release. “These companies employ loggers and truck drivers that need to be making money to feed their families.”

The U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Bureau of Land Management have contracts to log their lands with about 400 companies nationwide — including Eugene-based Murphy Company, High Cascade Inc, which operates a sawmill in Hood River, and South Bay Timber, LLC, which has operations in Ashland and Williams.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

 

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Guest
+1 #1 Facts Do Not Matter to the LeftGuest 2013-10-16 18:20:59
How ironic that the Left is constantly talking about renewable resources but blocks the most renewable in our state. Instead of providing good jobs, timber for building, and a reduction in the unemployment that has this state moribund, the Greenies would rather slice up birds with wind power or look for sun in Oregon's gray skies. I watched as company after company moved to the South. Will we sound the final death knell for our great industry and for what purpose?
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Guest
0 #2 RE: Companies sue to lift logging banGuest 2013-10-17 01:57:56
The tree huggers should never have been allowed to set policy. Yet they did!
Were our officials asleep at the switch?


How can the industry be put back on the map and the wrong corrected?
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