CRC facing more hurdles

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Monday, October 14, 2013

Oregon lawmakers face hurdles ahead of a proposed special session on the Columbia River Crossing.

The political landscape has changed significantly since the Oregon Legislature overwhelmingly approved $450 million in state highway bonds for the project. That funding disappeared Sept.30, however, because the bill required that Washington pay its share.

Supporters, including business and labor groups, say building the bridge is still critical. They’re looking to barrel ahead on a $2.7 billion Oregon-led plan that relies heavily on tolls, cutting interchanges in Washington out after that state’s lawmakers bailed on a plan this summer to kick in $450 million.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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