Eugene plant has a surplus of sewage

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Monday, October 14, 2013

The Metropolitan Wastewater Management Commission's Eugene sewage treatment plant is dumping more sewage into the river than might be good for the environment.

Historically, the agency has pumped its treated sewage — up to 30 million gallons a day — into the Willamette River, from the agency’s sewage plant next to Randy Papé Beltline.

But to better protect imperiled fish from the harmfully warm sewage water, the agency figures it needs to cut that dumping by the tune of a few million gallons a day.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

 

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