Hood River entrepreneur fighting in court

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Monday, October 07, 2013

Hood River businessman Jim Cole is fighting in court in support of his multimillion-dollar companies Maxam Laboratories and TurboSonic USA.

The government accuses Cole of being a modern-day snake oil salesman who claims to cure everything from autism to vertigo with his popular diet-supplement sprays and TurboSonic exercise equipment.

The government has leveled a series of allegations during the past few years at Cole, his companies and the somewhat mysterious supplier of powders that Maxam uses to make its nutritional-supplement sprays.

His supplier, Daniel George of Massachusetts, is said to be a chemistry genius but has no four-year college degree and served two stretches in prison for tax evasion and conspiring to make and distribute amphetamine, according to court records. But to date he faces no charges in relation to his association with Cole.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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