Ashland could charge residents to support recycle center

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Tuesday, October 01, 2013

The Ashland City Council is considering charging residents to support the Recycle Center, which costs $155,000 to run each year.

Councilors have a range of options to consider for subsidizing the Recycle Center, which so far has been paid for by Recology Ashland Sanitary Service customers through their garbage bills.

The council could charge either a $1.60 monthly fee or a 4 percent monthly fee on garbage customers. The percentage-based fee would have a bigger impact on businesses, which produce more garbage and pay higher bills than residents.

Read more at The Mail Tribune.

 

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