Oregon energy hub could become dangerous in earthquake

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Monday, September 23, 2013

A state report warns that Oregon's Critical Energy Infrastructure hub could become a huge risk when a major earthquake occurs.

The report pinpoints the "critical infrastructure energy hub" between Sauvie Island and the Fremont Bridge crammed with tank farms, transmission towers, bridges, pipelines and electrical substations. The hub is a six-mile stretch near downtown Portland that could become Oregon's Achilles heel when the Big One comes. Its structures were built on soils prone to liquefaction and lateral spreading before scientists understood earthquake risks.

The report's main author, Yumei Wang, a geotechnical engineer at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, says the point of the study wasn't to scare people. "We are trying to understand the problem better and work together with the energy sector to reduce the major vulnerabilities."

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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