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Oregon minimum wage raises to $9.10

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Must Reads
Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Oregon's minimum wage will raise 15 cents per hour to $9.10 beginning Jan. 1.

For someone who works 30 hours per week, the increase will result in $234 more to spend each year. Avakian said that will amount to about $20 million more spread through the Oregon economy.

According to a report released Tuesday by the Oregon Employment Department, Oregon’s average wage in August was $22.36 per hour.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

 

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