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Hot weather affecting Oregon potatoes

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Must Reads
Monday, September 09, 2013

Hot weather will probably reduce the eastern Oregon potato crop in both size and yield.

Oregon planted close to 40,000 acres of potatoes in 2013, of which 25,000-30,000 acres are found around Hermiston and Boardman.

In Oregon, 75 percent of potatoes are processed and 15 percent of the products exported to countries such as Japan, Taiwan and South Korea, according to the potato commission. Nearly 25 percent of all french fries exported from the United States come from Oregon.

Read more at The Mail Tribune.

 

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