Home Must Reads Prineville considers microhomes

Prineville considers microhomes

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Must Reads
Friday, September 06, 2013

Prineville's current code doesn't allow microhomes, which are growing in popularity.

Presently, a modular home (built off-site) has to be at least 750 sq. ft. in size, and multi-sectional (double- or triple-wide), to be placed on a city lot.

“If it’s not that size, it has to be in a (mobile home) park,” Smith said. “But there is no size limit if you build an on-site stick home. If you have a lot, you can build whatever you want on site, it doesn’t matter how big (or small) it is.”

Smith explained that the current code was implemented to regulate mobile homes that wouldn’t necessarily fit in visually with other homes in a neighborhood. However, many of these micro-homes are quite attractive, more so than some conventional “box” homes clad with the standard T-111 siding.

Read more at The Central Oregonian.

 

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