Sequestration affecting Central Oregon seniors

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Thursday, August 29, 2013

Many services for the elderly were cut in Central Oregon due to sequestration.

Pam Norr, Executive Officer for Central Oregon Council on Aging (COCOA), said that the across-the-board cuts to discretionary funds include the Older American Act. The cuts represent approximately 15 percent to the programs that are funded through the Older American Act, such as Meals on Wheels, and meals served at the senior centers around the tri-county area. Although the Oregon Senate provided a short funding reprieve until September, Norr said that coming up next month, they will take a significant cut in the meal programs.

Read more at The Central Oregonian.

 

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