Dream Girl Espresso plans expansion

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Forest Grove's controversial Dream Girl Espresso is looking to expand in the Portland Metro area.

A new stand will likely open in the next month or two either in Tigard or Beaverton. Co-owner Jeff Hebner said the company hopes to add a stand every quarter in the coming year, depending on the availability of locations with a suitable coffee kiosk, enough passing traffic and a big enough parking lot for trucks or a line of cars.

DG LLC, the corporation that operates Dream Girl, currently has two stands. The Hillsboro location opened without much buzz in March. The Forest Grove location, which opened July 25, is another story, sparking an ongoing debate that spilled into an opening-day protest and a packed City Council meeting Aug. 12.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

More Articles

It's a Man's Man's Man's World

May 2015
Friday, April 24, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Male tech workers speak out on the industry's gender troubles.


Read more...

Power Players

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY ROBERT MULLIN

A new energy-sharing agreement sparks concerns about independence and collaboration in the region's utility industry.


Read more...

Banking Perspective

April 2015
Thursday, March 26, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Craig Wanichek, president and CEO of Summit Bank.


Read more...

Celestial Eats

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER AND EILEEN GARVIN

A power lunch at Solstice Wood Fire Cafe & Bar.


Read more...

Downtime with the director of Barley's Angels

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play with Christine Jump.


Read more...

Emperor of the Sea

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY COURTNEY SHERWOOD | Photos by Jason E. Kaplan

Pacific Seafood, one of the world’s largest processors, is rebranding as a more transparent and consumer-friendly operation. A controversial CEO and monopoly accusations from coastal fishermen complicate the tale.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS