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Eugene trees fed by sewage being harvested

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Must Reads
Thursday, August 22, 2013

The first trees grown at Biocycle Farm in Eugene are being harvested. It is the nation's largest tree farm fed with treated sewage sludge, known as biosolids.

The Metropolitan Wastewater Management Commission, which collects and treats the sewage generated by residents in the Eugene-Springfield area, owns and operates the nearly 400-acre tree farm northwest of Eugene along Highway 99.

The commission has contracted with Lane Forest Products to clear approximately 12,700 trees that were planted in 2003 and have grown to a height of at least 60 feet, with an option to harvest the remaining 25,300 or so trees over the next two years.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

 

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