ADX helps members collaborate

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Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Portland shared workshop ADX helps hundreds make money from their creations.

The workshop has everything designers need, including tools, space and help.

ADX has 150 members of all ages and backgrounds. They build everything from electric bikes to artistic sculptures. Roy says members call it a gym for your creative side.

Read more at KGW.

 

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