Portland gets 'Harvested by Women' coffee

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Friday, August 16, 2013

Boyd's coffee in Portland will be the first U.S. roaster to sell coffee certified as "Harvested by Women."

It's a worldwide verification system that makes sure the coffee is grown, harvested and sold in a way that promotes a fair and sustainable lifestyle for the women involved in coffee production.

The certification also ensures those women are fairly compensated. Spokeswoman Katy Boyd Dutt said the company is willing to pay a premium for the beans if it’ll help to keep those farms sustainable.

Read more at KGW.

 

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