Coos Bay Kmart closing permanently

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Thursday, August 08, 2013

The Coos Bay Kmart is closing permanently Nov. 8 after 40 years in business.

The corporate downsizing leaves 25 workers without jobs, although they can apply to other Kmarts and Sears, said Howard Riefs, the director of corporate communications at Sears Holdings Corp., which owns Kmart. The closest Kmart is in Roseburg. There is a Sears in North Bend and Florence.

“We didn’t have the business like we used to,” he said. “Retail’s a little tough right now.”

Read more at The World.

 

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