North Bend tattoo business hosts unique food drive

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Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Flying Chicken Tattoo in North Bend is hosting a food drive where customers can get a free tattoo if they bring in $50 worth of non-perishable food.

For beginners and veterans in the world of body ink, they are offering a tempting and unprecedented bargain for a service that typically starts at $125 an hour.

This food drive is unique in another way. A minimum donation of $50, in food or funds, is needed along with a receipt. The intent is simply to ensure that people aren’t trading food stamps or other non-negotiable assets for a tat.

Read more at The World.

 

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