Oregon could get EV combo charger

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Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Oregon electric vehicle advocates are negotiating to get the first Society of Automotive Engineers-backed J1772 combo charger at Electric Avenue at Portland State University.

The combo plug works on the just-released Chevrolet Spark EV and the BMW i3, which will hit the market later this year.

That the SAE quick charger will appear in Oregon at all could signify the beginning of a standards issue that nearly everyone involved with the issue equates to a “VHS versus Betamax” battle.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

 

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