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Wizer grocery store closing after 83 years

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Must Reads
Friday, August 02, 2013

The family-owned Wizer grocery store in Lake Oswego is closing after 83 years.

Jim Wizer first opened the store on October 29, 1929. That was also the day the stock market crashed and the Great Depression began, but the store survived with help from relatives.

People who have shopped at Wizers for decades said the store gives them a feeling of family. Some customers still keep personal tabs and Gene still works the counter and bags groceries. Only the beer and wine section of the store will remain open until a decision is made regarding final plans for the building.

Read more at KGW.

 

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