Home Must Reads Liquor privatization campaign arises again in Oregon

Liquor privatization campaign arises again in Oregon

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Must Reads
Wednesday, July 31, 2013

An initiative campaign to privatize liquor sales could arise again in Oregon, grocery store lobbyists say.

"We're getting very serious about doing something for 2014," said Joe Gilliam, who represents the Northwest Grocery Association. A decision on whether to go forward could come by the end of August, Gilliam said.

A key lawmaker said he would hold hearings during the Legislature's off season to look into "modernizing" the way the state deals with liquor, but wants the state to maintain control. "I'm in search of a middle ground," said Sen. Lee Beyer, D-Springfield, chairman of the Senate Business and Transportation Committee.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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