Oregon wheat stunted by dry spell

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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Eastern Oregon's wheat crop is suffering due to a lack of rain.

“In general, it’s going to be a far below-average harvest,” said extension soils scientist Don Wysocki of Oregon State University’s Pendleton center.

Total precipitation is about 70 percent of normal for the crop year beginning Sept. 1, 2012, he said, a deficit of about 4 inches.

So, a majority of wheat plants are growing to about 60-75 percent of average height.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

 

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