Improving economy means bigger Street of Dreams

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Monday, July 29, 2013

The 38th annual Street of Dreams holds many signs that Oregon's economy is improving.

"I've never done a water slide before," says Dennis Pahlisch, the owner of Bend- and Portland-based Pahlisch Homes, which has participated in the Street of Dreams since 2011. "This year, our buyers totally freed up our budgets."

Organized by the Portland-area Home Builder's Association, the Street of Dreams is designed as a showcase for the latest innovations in home building and decor. Of the one-acre homes built for this year's show, seven sold before Saturday's public opening. The two Pahlisch-built houses in this year's show, "Blackmore" and "Clearhaven," pre-sold for $2.3 million and $2.2 million, respectively.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

 

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