Springfield welcomes food carts

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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Springfield passed to amendments altering municipal code to allow business owners to sell food on the streets.

The goal is to stimulate economic activity and foot traffic in the area known as the Downtown Redevelopment Zone as well as in Glenwood, Mohawk and other commercial districts.

Under previous city code, food carts were considered “transient merchants” and not permitted in many areas, including downtown. The code lumped them in the same category as Christmas tree and fireworks stands, said Kevin Ko, a city economic development employee.

Read more at The Register Guard.

 

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