Dialsmith develops marketing tech

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Thursday, July 18, 2013

Beaverton-based Dialsmith makes a small device called a perception analyzer that helps in marketing research in 45 countries.

While the audience is watching say a TV show or commercial, individuals turn the dial up or down depending on what they like or dislike. The data is collected every second, then analyzed.

During the presidential debates since Ronald Reagan, the technology's been used to help political parties shape their message.

Read more at KGW.

 

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