Oregon OKs 'last resort' wolf killing

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Monday, July 15, 2013

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted rules to amend the state's Wolf Management Plan.

It will make Oregon the only state in the West where killing wolves can be a last resort after they attack livestock.

The rules require ranchers to show they have taken non-lethal steps, such as alarm boxes and low strings of fluttering plastic flags known as fladdery, to protect their herds before the state will send out a hunter to kill a wolf. There must also be hard evidence, such as GPS data showing a radio-collared wolf was in the area when a cow was killed, that wolves have attacked four times.

In return, ranchers get new rights to shoot wolves they see attacking their herd, but only if those non-lethal protections are in place, and attacks have become chronic.

Read more from The AP.

Read Oregon Business' story about the wolf tourism controversy.

{biztweet}oregon wolf{/biztweet}

 

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