Oregon startup outsources work to tribes instead of offshore

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Monday, July 15, 2013

Mission, Oregon startup Cayuse Technologies has grown to 298 employees by outsourcing rurally instead of going to India.

For tax purposes, the company is located on the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Cayuse Technologies has three main service offerings: application outsourcing (development and maintenance of software programs), business process outsourcing (offers secretarial support and services for executive clients) and infrastructure outsourcing (help desk).

Rural outsourcing was a new concept when Cayuse was formed. Rather than sending informational technology services overseas on the cheap, the idea is to recruit and hire employees from a local and rural area.

Read more at The Columbian.

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