Portland residents may get electricity rate increases

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Friday, July 12, 2013

Portland-area residents will probably pay more for their electricity next year.

The Oregon Public Utility Commission staff announced Thursday that they negotiated revised electricity rate increases with Portland General Electric and PacifiCorp, the two largest Oregon electricity providers.

The new electricity rates would begin Jan. 1, 2014.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

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