TriMet plans e-fare system

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Thursday, July 11, 2013

TriMet is hoping to add a new fare system that allows riders to use debit-like cards.

One proposal would make the basic fare, currently $2.50, good for three hours instead of two. The other would introduce an electronic-fare debit card to replace weekly and monthly passes – and maybe that fare box – starting in 2015.

Of the two plans, however, only the $30 million e-fare system – with riders paying for ahead of time by loading funds into a secure "tap card" account that can also be used with some credit cards and smartphones – seemed close to a sure thing.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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