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Oregon employers find jobs hard to fill

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Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Nearly half of the vacant jobs in Oregon are classified as "difficult to fill," according to a new report by the Employment Department.

Difficult-to-fill vacancies are more likely to require education beyond high school and are much more likely to require previous work experience, generally in that industry or specific occupation, the Employment Department said. They also tended to be higher-paying jobs than the ones employers said they weren’t having trouble filling — $20.91 per hour vs. $15.50.

The two top reasons employers gave for difficulty in filling positions was lack of qualified candidates and unfavorable working conditions, such as irregular schedules; too few hours or too many hours; and stressful, difficult or physically demanding work. Those two reasons were cited by 18 percent of employers. The next most common problems cited by employers trying to fill positions were lack of applicants (14 percent) and lack of work experience (13 percent).

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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