Columbia River Crossing dead in the water

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Monday, July 01, 2013

Columbia River Crossing managers are closing the project, ending 96 jobs.

Opponents are celebrating the demise of the plan to link Portland and Vancouver with a $3.4 billion bridge, highway and light-rail complex.

Stunned CRC supporters are trying to pick up pieces of the decade-long initiative that shattered Saturday in the Washington Legislature.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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Guest
0 #1 RE: Columbia River Crossing dead in the waterGuest 2013-07-01 18:49:32
And $100 Million in repeated studies down the drain.
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Guest
0 #2 RE: Columbia River Crossing dead in the waterGuest 2013-07-01 19:05:31
The CRC was a "conspiracy"? By whom, and for what reasons?

Why does this publication give voice to officials whose default position is that everything is a conspiracy?

The safety of commuters is now in your hands, Mr. Benton. Enjoy!
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Guest
+1 #3 Realistic assumptions and functional designGuest 2013-07-01 21:59:52
This project got off base when it became to focused on "vision" and not focused enough on acceptable trade offs. Example: We can't move Pearson Air Field but we can find money to move employers upstream that would be impacted by the design. Another example, light rail has to be on the bridge for funding reasons even if one state is not the least bit interested in light rail? Bike paths as a priority? Really? Both sides need to come back to earth and figure out a bridge design that works for both sides of the river.
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Guest
0 #4 Executive DirectorGuest 2013-07-05 18:59:53
What a boondogle, I believe in light rail as an option but it shouldn't be on the surface streets taking out traffic lanes, but instead elevated like the monarail in Seattle was envisioned 60 years ago. The Portland light rail has taken out more traffic lanes especially Interstate avenue which used to be a good 4 lane alternative to I-5 but has been changed to a bootleneck with two light rail tracks jamming up the works. We should build light rail to suplement auto & truck traffic not complicate it.
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