Oregon slashes health insurance premium requests

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

Oregon regulators slashed health insurance rate requests by as much as 35%.

The state's rate decisions show that monthly premiums for a single, 40-year-old Portland-area male nonsmoker -- the example provided by the state -- start at $166 a month and go as high as $274 for basic plans.

In Oregon, many consumers will pay higher premiums, in part because insurers now can not discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions. Also, federal rule changes mean people under 50 will tend to pay more, and lower cost catastrophic-care plans will no longer be available to most people.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}oregon health{/biztweet}

 

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