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Oregon unemployment benefits rise

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Must Reads
Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The amount of unemployment benefits that Oregonians can receive will rise slightly next week.

The maximum weekly benefit amount an individual can receive will rise to $538, while the minimum amount will be $126.

The change affects new unemployment insurance claims effective on or after June 30, 2013. Those with existing unemployment claims will continue to receive the same weekly amount.

Read more at KTVZ.

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