NexPlanar gets $5M venture loan

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Hillsboro semiconductor startup NexPlanar secured a $5 million loan to expand production.

NexPlanar makes pads that flatten silicon wafers during computer chip production, aiming to reduce defects and improve the wafers’ quality. The company moved its headquarters to Oregon in 2008 and began limited production in 2008.

Earlier this year the company reported $10 million in venture capital investment and said it would expand production in Oregon and begin operations in Asia. The company grew to 50 Hillsboro employees, up from 15 in 2011.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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