Ochoco keeping office in Prineville

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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Despite Ochoco Lumber's decision to sell off 32,475 acres of timberland, the company will still keep their headquarters in Prineville.

The property is the last of the timberland Ochoco Lumber Company owns in Crook and Jefferson counties, but they will retain approximately 14,000 acres in Grant County, which is in close proximity to their sawmill near John Day, Ore.

“We have six employees who are based out of Prineville, and this is home for us,” [president Bruce Daucsavage] said. “We have the opportunity with the United States Forest Service sales over there, by investing dollars back into the Grant County community, we can create more jobs over there and keep our mill operating.”

Read more at The Central Oregonian.

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