OHSU releases projected tuition hikes

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Monday, June 24, 2013

Oregon Health & Science University is projecting tuition hikes despite what is expected to be another profitable year.

The university, which employs more than 14,000 faculty and staff, is projecting 5 percent growth next year to $2.2 billion in revenue, according to its 2014 proposed budget. Of that, $65 million will be operating income, or profits.

The tuition hikes will include 2.5 percent for the School of Medicine and 5 percent for the School of Nursing and bachelor's degree students. Among medical schools, OHSU's in-state tuition ranks third in the nation, down from first in 2009-2010.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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