PGE says bidding process was fair

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Friday, June 21, 2013

Portland General Electric responded to critics, saying its recent competitive bidding process for new resources was fair.

Oregon's largest utility just completed a three-year process to choose vendors for its biggest acquisition of new generation resources in decades. The plan comprises a $1.3 billion investment in three power plants: a 440-megawatts gas fired plant to provide baseload power to customers, 200 megawatts in flexible capacity to fill in for intermittent and seasonal needs, and a new wind farm to meet state renewable energy mandates.

Other bidders have called the results into question. Calpine Corp, for instance, says it offered a significantly cheaper option than the baseload plant PGE chose at Boardman. The backers of a proposed 650-megawatt plant in Troutdale, meanwhile, have asked the PUC to issue a declaratory ruling blocking PGE's ability to recover some or all of its investment. Other bidders have asked to participate in the PUC's deliberation.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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