Fast food restaurants change with the times

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Friday, June 21, 2013

A Hillsboro McDonald's and Tigard Burgerville are among local quick service restaurants that are changing their looks.

The Burgerville restaurant that opened at 12785 S.W. Pacific Highway in Tigard last year is also a departure from the company’s classic drive-up styling. It features a natural wood interior and ultra-modern touches such as a large interactive TV screen that shows Instagram messages and Twitter photos from folks inside the restaurant.

Burgerville, which is locally owned, is also designing a brand new restaurant at the Portland International Airport. Company officials are spending months trying to figure out how to appeal to on-the-run travelers these days. When it opens later this year, it will be the company’s 40th restaurant in the Pacific Northwest.

Read more at The Hillsboro Tribune.

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