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Multnomah County jail gets organic garden

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Thursday, June 20, 2013

Multnomah County's Inverness Jail launched a pilot project of 12 raised garden beds as part of the Sustainable Jail Project.

With an average jail stay of just two weeks, most inmates won’t remain long enough at Inverness to see the plants grow from seed to food on the table. However, some 40 percent of them are subject to county supervision for probation, parole or other terms after their release. Jailers and staff from the county Office of Sustainability hope they are “planting a seed” among those who participate in the garden project.

The initial round of Sustainable Jail Project initiatives, including reusing water at the jail laundry and recycling inmate sandals, saved an estimated $400,000 a year, while reducing the environmental footprint from the self-contained complex near Northeast Airport Way and 122nd Avenue.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}jail garden{/biztweet}

 

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